Friday, 3 January 2014

Bistro de Artistes needs a 'no belt' policy.

When you finally catch up with friends you haven’t seen for months, an average restaurant just won’t do. And so it was that we found ourselves in the very French brainchild of Alain Fabregues and Emmanuel Mollois, Bistro des Artistes in Subiaco. Now I just need to find another suitably important reason to return.


Bistro des Artistes © The Ponder Room


With entrees around $25, mains at $45 and desserts $15, we opted for the all-inclusive $75 menu and undid our belts in readiness.

The meal started with soup of the day, a cute cup of rich, slightly pumpkin flavoured, creamy soup to wake up the tastebuds.


Bistro des Artistes © The Ponder Room

Next came entrée and none of us could go passed the Roasted Lobster tail with Risotto and Saffron sauce (shown above). It was divine. Just the right amount of risotto, enough to get the taste without spoiling yourself for what was to come, or so we thought.

We managed to all pick something different for the main, although if I’m honest two of us opted for the salmon. Wrapped in pastry and serviced with orange infused cabbage, it was a surprisingly large portion. I could easily have ordered a cup of tea and left happy at that point, but no there was more …



Bistro des Artistes © The Ponder Room

A suitably French, polite waiter arrived, bread basket in hand, and placed it in the middle of the table along with Le Fromage du jour, cheese of the day … Victorian Double Brie. The cheese was accompanied with a small bowl of date slices and apple slithers that had been marinated in yoghurt. It reminded me of Birsher Muesli.
Bistro des Artistes © The Ponder Room
By now we were all leaning on the backs of our chairs, tummies giving off contented rumbles. Sadly we were unable to finish the cheese.
No sooner was the cheese removed from the table, when the pre-dessert arrived … rice pudding and a crème fresh consistency ice cream.
Bistro des Artistes © The Ponder Room
 
As is tradition, my three guests and I chose different desserts so we could try some of each. I had the Floating Islands, mainly because I had attempted to make these delicate pillows many years ago. Mine were less ‘island’ and more … speed bump really. So it was a delight to sample the real thing. The egg white evaporated in my mouth, leaving the heady brandy sauce to put a smile on my face.
Bistro des Artistes © The Ponder Room
 
My well-travelled guests agreed the Traditional Crème Brulee was the best they had eaten, and that is high praise. The third dish was a clafoutis with blueberry, apricot and hazelnut craquelin, which was good, but couldn’t compete with the Brulee. Our jousting spoons fighting to crack the toffee on the top of the Brulee.
Bistro des Artistes © The Ponder Room
 
Coffees and teas ordered, we watched as our half eaten desserts were removed. Half eaten because we couldn’t eat another bite, not because they weren’t good.
Bistro des Artistes © The Ponder Room
 
And then just to make sure we were completely wrecked, the petits fours arrived, delicate lemon meringue squares begging to be eaten.


Bistro des Artistes © The Ponder Room

The setting was beautiful ...
Bistro des Artistes © The Ponder Room
Bistro des Artistes © The Ponder Room
Bistro des Artistes © The Ponder Room
 
 
The staff attentive without being gushy, and the food inspirational and surprisingly plentiful.
All I can say is thank god they didn’t arrive with a wafer. I highly recommend the restaurant and the all-inclusive deal, just don’t eat for a day or two before you go.
 
For more information go to http://www.bistrodesartistes.com.au/
 
 
 
 
 
 
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